Category Archives: PPC

Winning!: 3 Things To Consider for a Badass Mobile PPC Campaign

For PPC campaigns this year, one of the key challenges will be ensuring that the opportunity for increased sales via mobile traffic is efficiently and profitably taken.

Before we focus specifically on PPC traffic, there have been some really interesting statistics published recently to help put into context just how important mobile traffic will be this year:

  • 61% of shoppers used a smartphone before a shopping trip, spending more on average than those who didn’t.
  • In 2013, the percentage of in-store sales where mobile phones were used as part of the shopping journey in the UK stood at 6.8%. This equates to £18bn of sales, a figure 45% up on 2012.
  • For John Lewis, sales from click-and-collect jumped 60% compared with 2012.
  • In the grocery market, as much as 15% of UK sales, worth £900m, is thought to have been booked online between 20 and 23 December.
  • Rising consumer confidence coupled with the convenience of purchasing on a hand-held device has contributed to 50% of year-to-year mobile commerce growth in 2013 over 2012.
  • 40% of all PLA (product listing advert) clicks will occur on smartphones by the close of 2014.

As expected, the trend of visits continues in an upwardly motion, but importantly, the role of mobile traffic in the path to purchase is becoming more important (be it by influencing decisions, or as is happening more and more, the purchase itself).

So, to quickly set the scene for optimising your mobile PPC, here’s a…

…brief introduction to AdWords Enhanced Campaigns 

In mid-2013, Google completed the migration to Enhanced Campaigns, a format designed to allow you to better integrate your cross-device strategies.

Previous to this, many PPC experts had segmented their campaigns based on the device (one for desktop, one for tablet, one for mobile). Although this was the preferred method, it’s perhaps sub-optimal, requiring up-keeping three times as many campaigns.

Enhanced campaigns introduced a number of ‘mobile-specific’ features – most notably, the ‘bid multiplier’. What did this mean? Rather than having set a separate amount, your mobile bids would just be a factor of your overall bid (for example, a bid of -100% would turn off mobile activity).

Initial reactions were that this was a less flexible solution, but I’ve found some features to be highly useful for improving the mobile side of AdWords campaigns.

Three important strategies for improving your mobile AdWords results

To make the most of what is clearly now a huge opportunity, what strategies should you be including as part of your PPC campaign in 2014?

Below I outline three areas for consideration as part of your overall PPC strategy:

Use insightful reporting

At a very basic level, you should be clear about the split of traffic/cost/revenue between different device types.

How much traffic is coming from mobile and how does its behaviour compare to desktop and tablet?

To get more insight, we need to start considering the role of mobile in the user journey.

There are plenty of figures around which help to understand why we expect to see a lower conversion rate from mobile visitors: along with reservations about purchasing (#fact#) on a mobile device, the role of mobile visits can be slightly different, giving a need for understanding the value of these visits in the path to conversion.

For single-device paths, we can get good visibility of the touch-points, for example, using the Model Comparison Tool or Multi-Channel Funnels features of Google Analytics:

For cross-device paths, it becomes a lot more difficult for cookie-based tracking to provide this kind of detail. What we do have for AdWords campaigns are Estimated Conversions.

In Google’s own words:

Cross-device conversions start as a click on a search ad on Google.com on one device and end as a conversion on another device (or in a different web browser on the same device).

For example, say someone shops for ‘blue jeans’ on her mobile phone while waiting for the morning train. She clicks on a mobile ad for ABC Blue Jeans.  hen she gets to her office, she goes directly to the ABC website to make a purchase.

This is an example of a cross-device conversion. We calculate cross-device conversions using a sample of data from users who signed into multiple devices.

The last part in bold is important to understand: the ‘estimation’ of your conversion is achieved by aggregating data from a sample set of signed-in Google users.

By analysing data across thousands of advertisers. Google estimates incremental conversions can be somewhere between 2% and 12% depending on vertical.

In AdWords, this report would look something like this:

Taking the full picture into account allows you to make better decisions about your bidding strategies, and when you can see the full value, it enables you to make a better case for pushing for greater mobile presence.

Tailoring your campaigns for mobile

Given we have good awareness of differences in user behaviour depending on the current device in use, we should cater to this by ensuring the advertising is tailored specifically to mobile users.

There are a few options for doing this in AdWords:

Mobile-optimised ads:

Selecting that an advert’s device preference is ‘Mobile’ means that this specific advert will be shown to mobile users. This is useful for ensuring your proposition appeals to the mobile user.

Examples of tailoring ads could be:

  • Calls-to-action which appeal to mobile users (e.g. ‘Mobile friendly site’).
  • Specific offers which appeal specifically to mobile users.
  • Using shorter, more direct ad copy if ‘click-to-call’ buttons are truncating your text:

Mobile-only sitelinks:

It can be well worth creating differing strategies for your mobile and for desktop/tablet sitelinks.  Considerations for mobile sitelinks are:

there are only two shown, ensure that your two key sitelinks are given priority on mobile searches

deep-linking to sites of the section specifically to help mobile users quickly navigate the site (e.g. highlighting the ‘Best sellers’ or ‘New Range’ pages could help ‘fast-forward’ the user journey)

Be pro-active about improving landing page performance

As the lower mobile-site conversion can be a barrier which is limiting your exposure (by making competitive bid prices unprofitable), review the landing pages and find areas of opportunity.

But this is a PPC article, not a conversion optimisation piece? Something I’ve learned through the years of handling PPC campaigns is that, by the nature of the beast (i.e. repeatedly firing traffic at a site and measuring its value), you develop a really valuable, granular view of how well a page is performing, which helps identify issues and areas for improvement.

When conversion is hindering your PPC performance, raise awareness of the issues and, when possible, suggest solutions. A good PPC account manager cares deeply about post-click activity.

Conclusion

Hopefully you’ve picked up some useful thoughts on how to go about improving your mobile PPC presence and results over the next year.

Do you have any favoured strategies for succeeding with mobile PPC campaigns? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

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Winter Olympics Buzz: Which Companies Are Cashing in via Ecommerce?

Russia is currently in the spotlight hosting the Winter Olympics, with all the associated negative press for its government.

But whatever the irregularities of Vladimir Putin, Russia has the third highest economic growth rate in the world.

Although online sales in Russia account for just 2% retail sales, this is estimated to rise to 5%, or $46bn, by 2015 according to Morgan Stanley.

And Russian internet users are in thrall to overseas brands. In 2013 the top 25 brands searched for on Yandex, the top Russian search engine with 61% share, were all overseas fashion brands.

So what are international ecommerce outlets waiting for? Shouldn’t everyone be importing into Russia?

One new hurdle to expansion into Russia is increased complexity in shipping since new import laws were implemented in December 2013.

What do you need to know about Russia, who’s already taking advantage and how can you follow suit?

I heard wnDirect’s Jonathan Matchett talk about ecommerce distribution into Russia at MetaPack’s Delivery Conference earlier this month.

Here are the key takeaways.

The market

There are certainly lots of Russians online. With 70m already online in 2013, by the end of 2014 the country is predicted to have 80m internet users. This will equate to 56% of the population.

Who is there already?

ASOS has been selling into Russia since December 2012, as has Net-A-Porter.

eBay and AliExpress (part of Alibaba) have Russian sites and Amazon ships most products to Russia. Amazon’s platform will even translate a brand’s British store automatically.

Ozon, Russia’s own marketplace, is the current market leader, reporting $492m in revenue in 2012.

Here is Ozon CEO, Maelle Gavet, on consumer trends in Russia.

Delivery

Shipping and payment are cited as the most common hurdles to market entry. Cash on delivery is a common payment method, which can result in high returns rates.

In Russia there’s the perception of unreliable end-carrier postal service but in actuality the fulfilment levels are relatively high.

However, many carriers into Russia, including DHL and FedEx, have pulled out due to changes to import laws.

The documentation needed for ecommerce imports has increased dramatically and includes proof of value and credit card ownership. Credit card documentation in particular, having to be presented at customs, has caused problems for carriers.

Search

Getting to grips with Yandex is one of the other difficulties for importing retailers.

Russia has more internet users than any other European nation and 61% of them search on Yandex. 6% of internet users have already bought online from a foreign retailer.

Social can also influence search, with around 40m Russian users using social media sites every month. Having a social strategy can be a valuable boost to getting a foothold in the ecommerce market.

Google Me Baby: DIgital Marketing help for small business in 2014

Lost in the new age of Digital Marketing? Do the words SEO, PPC and backlinks confuse you? Ready to jump on the social media bandwagon you’ve for so long avoided to getting your business out there?

We’re here to help! Digital Marketing guru’s here to help break down everything you’ll need to get your business’s online marketability up to par with others in your field.

Ready set, lets go!